End of Year Achievement and Attainment Highlights 2015-2016

The Village School assesses pupil progress across a range of indicators which contain, amongst others, Our ‘Progress 8 basket of indicators’. Below is an analysis of our ‘Progress 8’ indicators compared to the previous academic year.
There has been a general improvement in attainment across ‘Progress 8’, from an already very high level, for all pupils and cohorts. Of particular significance is the closing of the gap between those who receive PPG and those that do not receive PPG. Pupils receiving PPG have made rapid progress as a result of targeted interventions. The Lanes sample, while showing a significant improvement, is based on a relatively small sample in comparison to other learning needs. The gap between boys and girls has also narrowed significantly.

 

Key Stage 5 Qualifications 2015-2016 

We have been offering AQA entry levels and GCSEs for a number of years and are proud to say that we have a 100% pass rate in GCSE grades A-G and a 100% pass rate at Entry Levels 1-3.

We started offering OCR Entry Levels in Life and Living Skills in the academic year (2014-2015). In that year, we had a 100% pass rate with 40% of students being entered and receiving an accreditation.

There were 53 passes last year within the OCR life skills units and 134 at the end of this year, a 40 % increase in the number of passes.

In the academic year (2015-2016) we also had a 100% pass rate but with a dramatic rise of 85 % of students being entered and receiving a qualification.

1 student was entered for GCSE English and Maths and received a C (English) and an E (Maths) which was an outstanding achievement.

This year, we are developing our qualifications even further with a projection of 100% of village 3 students’ receiving an OCR qualification.

We currently offer OCR qualifications in the following areas - Communication, Numeracy, Home management, World of work, Environment and Community, Horticulture, Personal skills.

Speech and Language Therapy GAS Goal Outcomes Summer 2016

Above are the levels of progress made between Autumn 2015 – Spring 2016 terms with regards to Speech and Language Therapy GAS goals. Below is an outline of the levels of progress made during the first 8 weeks of the Summer 2016 term with regards to Speech and Language Therapy GAS goals.

Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) is a way of measuring progress and outcome data which is used by many strands of the wider Multi-Disciplinary Team, in many settings. Goals are set out on a 5 point scale from -2 to +2. Using GAS enables data to be placed on a quantitative measurement scale, thus tackling the problem of how to adequately identify and measure qualitative goal impact and attainment.

The above chart indicates the percentages of progress the students have made with regards to their GAS goals during the first 8 weeks of the Summer term 2016. A table can also be found below, detailing the exact numbers of students who made less than expected, greater than expected or expected progress.

Less than expected progress indicates students that have minimal or no gains in therapy. The reasoning behind the limited progress has been due to absenteeism, sensory seeking behaviours, lack of engagement, medical issues and additional SALT input. In these cases, Speech and Language Therapists (SALTs) have made referrals to the Positive Behaviour and Inclusion Team (PBIT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) teams, in order to request input and support in the hopes that the student will be more likely to be able to make progress in the future, with regards to SALT goals. Due to priorities that the SALT department needed to address immediately, some students received limited input and therefore did not achieve their GAS goal as they required additional SALT input. Some of these priorities include new student admissions, meetings, training and providing input to students attending the College of North West London. A table has been completed below which highlights potential reasoning behind goals that were not met, as well as any referrals that have been made.

Students who made expected progress have progressed either 1 or 2 points. Students who have made greater than expected progress have made a progression of 3 points in relation to GAS goals. This is above what is expected of the students. Students who have made much greater than expected progress have made progress by 4 points (-2 to +2) which is much more than what would be expected for the student.

 

Progress made with regards to SALT GAS goals during this time period

The table below highlights the number of students and type of AAC equipment used during the school years of 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. Overall, the most significant change has occurred in the number of children who are now using high tech devices such as tablets and Eye Gaze. 23 students now have access to tablets in school and ten students have access to personal tablets that they can use both at home and at school. With regards to eye gaze; 7 students in total are now using eye gaze as a means of communication compared to 1 student in 2014-2015. As a result of this there has been a decrease in the use of Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS), reducing from 80 students to 71 students. Having said this, there has been an increase in the type of low tech AAC used throughout the school. More children are now using switches, communication books and choice boards including Aided Language Display (ALD) boards and E-tran frames to communicate their wants and needs. The SALT department (SALTs and SALT assistant) have been carrying out a mixture of 1:1 and group therapy sessions, as well as some support in the classroom, working on using AAC devices in a functional way.

Levels of Progress Key Stage 1 to 2

80% of pupils have made 2 or more levels in Language and Literacy by the end of Key Stage 2, with 70% making three or more levels of progress. This compares very favourably with the data set of expected progress from the Progression guidance 2010/2011, see below extract. 

Similarly, 80% of pupils have made 2 or more levels in Mathematics by the end of Key Stage 2, with 60% making three or more levels of progress. Again, this compares very favourably with the data set of expected progress from the Progression guidance 2010/2011, see below extract. 

  • 66% of all Key Stage 1 children, working below level 1(W) made two or more levels of progress by the end of Key Stage 2 in English.
  • 59.8% of all Key Stage 1 children, working below level 1(W) made two or more levels of progress by the end of Key Stage 2 in mathematics.’

 ‘Progression 2010–11, Advice on improving data to raise attainment and maximise the progress of learners with special educational needs (Ref: DFE-00557-2010) summary of data set 1 p12.)’

 Levels of Progress Key Stage 2 to 4
 

47% of our pupils make at least 3 or more levels of progress in Language and Literacy from key stage two to key stage four. A similar outcome occurs within Mathematics with 53% of key stage four pupils making 3 or more levels of progress.

 This compares very favourably with the data set of expected progress from the Progression guidance 2010/2011 (18.1% making 3 or more levels progress in Language and Literacy and 13.7% in Maths) as outlined below.

  • 18.1% of all Key Stage 2 learners, working below level 1(W) made three or more levels of progress by the end of Key Stage 4 in English.
  • 13.7% of all Key Stage 2 learners, working below level 1(W) made three or more levels of progress by the end of Key Stage 4 in mathematics.

 ‘Progression 2010–11, Advice on improving data to raise attainment and maximise the progress of learners with special educational needs (Ref: DFE-00557-2010) summary of data set 1 p12.)’ 

Review of Standards and Therapy Analysis 2015-2016
 
Below are our documents relating to the Review of Standards for 2015-2016 and our analysis of Therapy at The Village School for 2015-2016.